CLIMATE CHANGE IS NOT THE ONLY “INCONVENIENT TRUTH”

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Al Gore called his landmark presentation on climate change “An Inconvenient Truth.”  I think he chose the word “an” very purposefully,  He’s a smart guy, and he knows that climate change is not the only “inconvenient truth.”  There are many “inconvenient truths,”  subjects and realities that conventional American politics carefully avoids or glosses over.  Gore explored this in his subsequent book, “The Assault on Reason.” My campaign is dedicated to creating greater public awareness of and dialogue on these “inconvenient truths. ”  Here are some that come to mind.  If you have any you would like to nominate, feel free to comment!

GROWTH IS THE PROBLEM, NOT THE SOLUTION

Conventional politics is religiously dedicated to the proposition that fostering “economic growth” will solve all our problems, and that anything that halts or slows “economic growth” is a Bad Thing.  This theory has been most notoriously promulgated as “trickle-down economics,” AKA “Reaganomics,” but its practice is not confined to the GOP.  The fallacy of economic growth as a solution to our problems is that we live on a finite planet, with finite resources, and our dedication to “growth” is running up against the limits of those resources, whether we are talking about fossil fuels, phosphates, clean water, fish, other foodstuffs, arable land, oxygen, or anything else tangible.  If we use up all of these things, even over the next few hundred years, what will people (and  other animals) do to substitute for them in a thousand years?

The notion that whatever increases the Gross National Product is good, is gross.  Hurricane-caused damage increases the GNP.  Diseases that require expensive treatment increase the GNP; frequently, they are caused by other activities, such as environmental degradation, that increase the GNP.  Lots of things that increase the GNP make us less happy.  Happiness comes from a sane state of mind, not the possession of a mountain of toys.

“Economic growth” has tended to benefit those who are already wealthy more than those of us who are not.   That leads to another inconvenient truth, which is that

AMERICA IS AN OLIGARCHY

The wealthy and powerful, the people the Occupy! movement refers to as “The One Percent,” are the people who call the tune in this country. It doesn’t matter what is best for most people, whether it’s an open internet, a sane health care system, a decent neighbourhood, or a clean environment.  Our government will do what benefits the wealthy. The One Percent have bought Congress and, to a large extent, the courts.  They are garnering an increasing share of the income and wealth that is generated around the world.  Unless we and the wealthy happen to agree on a subject, “we, the people,” are unlikely to see our wishes respected in the law of the land.

THE FINANCIALIZATION OF OUR SOCIETY HAS BEEN A DISASTER

Once upon a time, multigenerational families and friendly neighbors were the rule, not the exception.  Childcare and elder care were provided by relatives and friends.  Most people were born, and died, at home, and in between birth and death they cooked their meals from scratch, sewed many of the clothes they wore, and fixed things that broke–which didn’t happen a lot, because things were made to last for generations.

Now, we are born and die in hospitals, at great expense. We pay for daycare for children and old age homes for elders.  Most people eat factory-prepared food, and buy clothing and household items maderedqueen by people on the other side of the globe that are often poorly made and need frequent replacement.  Materially,the net effect of this arrangement has been a huge transfer of wealth from the middle and lower classes to the wealthy families who own the corporations that provide these services.  Spiritually, we have also become impoverished, because families have become alienated from each other and their neighbors, and the self-confidence that comes from knowing basic skills such as cooking, sewing, and nursing, has been lost.

When everything costs money, there is less time for leisure and community.  It takes all the running we can do to stay in place.

“JOBS” AS WE HAVE KNOWN THEM ARE NOT COMING BACK

One way the One Percent have increased their share of the country’s wealth has been to export what were formerly middle-class jobs, both blue- and white-collar, to third world countries.  Most manufactured goods come from China, and, thanks to the internet, many desk jobs are now done in third world countries by people who are paid a fraction of what it would cost to hire an American to do them.

It’s not as if there’s “nothing to do” in America.  There’s plenty to do, it’s just that there’s not much in the way of government or private funding for what needs to be done.  Some things are big and need large scale backing, like soil and water conservation/reclamation or refocusing our infrastructure away from its current automobile fixation.  Other projects on our national “to do” list, like community gardening, remodelling homes for higher energy efficiency, and relearning the many skills that were lost when large manufacturing became the norm, such as shoemaking, sewing, simple blacksmithing, or the use of draft animals,  can be started on a small, local basis, creating an economy outside the money system so that people with little or no access to money can meet their basic needs, because….

WE ARE GOING TO GET POORER, NOT RICHER

The late sixties and early seventies were the time when “The American Dream” was closest to “being true.”  Average income was highest and income inequality was at its lowest.  We had far more leisure time than we have now.  There was plenty of grant–not loan–money for those who wanted a college education.  Those days are gone, and they are not coming back, but we still have the possibility of creating vibrant, cohesive local communities where people see their wealth in their circle of supportive friends, not in their bank accounts, large-screen TVs, and fancy cars.

IF YOU DON’T OWN AN AUTOMOBILE, YOU ARE A SECOND-CLASS CITIZEN

Proponents of mass transit tend to ignore an important fact about the physical layout of our culture:  pervasive automobile ownership has created a scattered society, one in which there are relatively few large clumps of people, common destinations and travel routes, or transit times. Maybe it doesn’t seem that way at rush hour, but if you analyzed the routes of all the cars on the road, you would find that very few of them could be replaced by their drivers switching to available, or even potential, public transportation.  If you don’t own a car, you are denied access to many neighborhoods, jobs, shopping areas, and much of the countryside, and restricted to certain ones.  Our state legislature has shown its disdain for Tennessee’s “second-class citizens” by restricting the use of state transportation funds for public transit projects.  Meanwhile, the need to buy, license, insure, and maintain an automobile puts a high financial barrier in the way of full participation in American society.

“OBAMACARE” IS NOT THE REFORM OUR HEALTH CARE SYSTEM NEEDS

I find it bizarre that opponents of “Obamacare” brand it as “socialism.”  It’s the very opposite of socialism–it mandates that we, the people, must buy a product from a corporation, or be penalized.  That’s not ‘socialism,” that’s a characteristic of “fascism‘–“a mutually beneficial business/government relationship.”  “Obamacare” (the prototype for which was created by the reactionary Heritage Foundation), like the bank bailout of 2008, essentially rewards the people who created the problem, by subsidizing people who could not otherwise afford private insurance, without putting any significant cost controls on either the insurance companies or the health care industry itself, an “industry” whose profits are completely out of line with the value of the products it offers.  This is because, as I said above, the U.S. is an oligarchy, and the pharmaceutical, insurance, and hospital owners can afford to buy their own Congresspeople.

Beyond that, our whole health care paradigm is flawed.  Many of our disease problems are caused by environmental factors, from the personal, such as lack of exercise, poor diet, inability to deal with stress, to the societal/environmental, such as the widespread availability of unhealthy “food,” lack of opportunity to do meaningful, healthy physical labor, and work and home environments that create stress.  Meanwhile, our doctors are trained to be symptom managers, not to look at the whole of a patient’s life, and are paid more, the more procedures and test they perform on a person.  There is no financial reward for a doctor whose patients are healthy and don’t need interventions.

OUR SCHOOLS ARE FAILING OUR CHILDREN BECAUSE OUR SOCIETY IS FAILING OUR CHILDREN

It used to be that, even with “just” a high school diploma and a reasonable level of intelligence, a young person could get a blue-collar job that would support him or her, plus a family, at a reasonable standard of living.  More recently, a college education was touted as the key to success in life.  Now, a college education has become the gateway to a lifetime of unrepayable, unsheddable debt, and a room in your parents’ basement.  What motivation do young people have to do well in school?  It’s not likely to get them anywhere.  Schools are increasingly little more than daycare for older kids, with harsh discipline for any who are smart enough to be bored and self-assured enough to show it.  The most dangerous drug epidemic in America isn’t crack or meth.  It’s the horrifying rate at which we are forcing our children to take psychiatric medications so they will “fit in” to a society that has nothing to offer them.

WE ARE RUNNING OUT OF TIME TO MAKE AN ORDERLY TRANSITION TO A SANER SOCIETY

I don’t see myself as a great political leader.  I am not charismatic.  I don’t remember names well, and I am better at understanding the big picture than I am at being a policy-wonk problem solver.  My candidacy is intended to promote ideas, not me.  I hope to see these “inconvenient truths”  enter the mainstream of American political discussion and inspire many people to take action, because they are the concerns we need to address if we are going to continue to have an “America.”

WE ARE NOT GOING TO BE SAVED BY SOME CHARISMATIC LEADER

I don’t have all the answers to the  many challenges we face, but WE do. We don’t need charismatic leadership.  Millions of ordinary people need to step out and to make intelligent decisions about how to conduct the business of their communities, their regions, their state, their nation, and the world.  The “Ten Key Values” that are the cornerstone of my political philosophy are a ten-wrench tool kit for rebuilding the world and making it wiser, friendlier, and more sustainable.  My campaign is an open invitation to the people of my House district, my city, and my state to join together, take up this toolkit, and create a better world.

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About brothermartin

i am an unrepentant hippie a born-again Buddhist an activist whose concerns span social justice, economic justice,ecology, climate change, peak oil, and how to break open America's fatally flawed two-party system an ecstatic musician a good listener a slow talker a great-grandfather deeply concerned about the fate of the world
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