IF I AM ELECTED

If, after the August 6th election, I am informed that I have won, the first thing I would do is demand a recount!  Surely there must be some mistake!

And that leads us to one of those “inconvenient truths” about Tennessee politics.

A recount would only recount what the voting machines recorded.  There would be no way to tell if what they recorded was the way voters intended to cast their ballots.  The computerized voting machines that we use in Tennessee have repeatedly been shown to be easily and untraceably hackable.  They can be programmed to switch votes from one candidate to another.

4254488952_Voting_Machines_Who_did_you_really_vote_for1_xlarge

We almost changed that system in 2006, when a coalition of Tennessee citizens succeeded in persuading the legislature to pass “The Tennessee Voter Confidence Act,” which mandated a return to recountable, verifiable paper ballots.   At that time, the state legislature had a Democrat majority, which graciously (or perhaps naively) allowed a Republican amendment to delay implementation of the act until after the 2008 election.  That election saw Tennessee’s Democrats swept from power in a Republican landslide, and one of the first things the new Republican majority did was repeal the Tennessee Voter Confidence Act. Subsequent elections have only strengthened their grip, giving our Republican-dominated legislature free reign to become the laughingstock of the nation, and the bane of working-class Tennesseans.

I have to wonder:  have the voters of Tennessee really succumbed to a mass epidemic of venality and selfishness, or are our elections rigged?  I would like to see a mass movement of Tennesseans demand that the U.S. Department of Justice look into this question.

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About brothermartin

i am an unrepentant hippie a born-again Buddhist an activist whose concerns span social justice, economic justice,ecology, climate change, peak oil, and how to break open America's fatally flawed two-party system an ecstatic musician a good listener a slow talker a great-grandfather deeply concerned about the fate of the world
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